TYPE OF SURGERIES

Birth defects

Burns related deformities

Accidents/Trauma Injuries

Swellings on any part of the body

Nerve Disorders

Miscellaneous

Aesthetic

Orthopedic

Craniosynostosis - Shape Deformities of Face and Skull

  • Craniosynostosis - Shape Deformities of Face and Skull

Description of disability:
* In the pictures shown above, there is a central protrusion of the mid-forehead due to coronal synostosis. Re-shaping of the cranium produced the desired flattening.

Craniosynostosis is a condition in which one or more of the fibrous sutures in an infant skull prematurely fuses by turning into bone (ossification), thereby changing the growth pattern of the skull. Because the skull cannot expand perpendicular to the fused suture, it compensates by growing more in the direction parallel to the closed sutures.an infant skull prematurely fuses by turning into bone (ossification), thereby changing the growth pattern of the skull. Because the skull cannot expand perpendicular to the fused suture, it compensates by growing more in the direction parallel to the closed sutures.an infant skull prematurely fuses by turning into bone (ossification), thereby changing the growth pattern of the skull. Because the skull cannot expand perpendicular to the fused suture, it compensates by growing more in the direction parallel to the closed sutures. Sometimes the resulting growth pattern provides the necessary space for the growing brain, but results in an abnormal head shape and abnormal facial features necessary space for the growing brain, but results in an abnormal head shape and abnormal facial features. necessary space for the growing brain, but results in an abnormal head shape and abnormal facial features. In cases in which the compensation does not effectively provide enough space for the growing brain, craniosynostosis results in increased effectively provide enough space for the growing brain, craniosynostosis results in increased effectively provide enough space for the growing brain, craniosynostosis results in increased intracranial pressure leading possibly to visual impairment, sleeping impairment, eating difficulties, or an impairment of mental development combined with a significant reduction in impairment, sleeping impairment, eating difficulties, or an impairment of mental development combined with a significant reduction in impairment, sleeping impairment, eating difficulties, or an impairment of mental development combined with a significant reduction in IQ. The main complications related to uncorrected craniosynostosis include increased intracranial pressure, asymmetry of the face, and malocclusion. Asymmetry of the orbits leads to strabismus.

Treatment:

Surgery is typically the recommended treatment. The goal of treatment is to reduce the pressure in the head and correct the deformities of the face and skull bones.

In general, the optimal time to perform surgery is before the child is 1 year of age since the bones are still very soft and easy to work with. Surgery may be necessary at a much earlier age depending upon the severity of the condition. In many cases, surgery can be performed as early as 1 month of age. Therefore, an early diagnosis and consultation with a specialist are important.

There are two common types of surgery for craniosynostosis

Traditional surgery, also called calvarial vault remodeling. During surgery, an incision is made in the infant's scalp. The shape of the head is corrected by moving the area that is abnormally fused or prematurely fused and then reshaping the skull so it can take more of a round contour. Surgery can last up to eight hours. The baby will likely spend one night in the ICU plus an additional 3-5 days in the hospital for monitoring.

Minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The minimally invasive surgery involves the use of an endoscope. The endoscope is a small tube which the surgeon can look through and see immediately inside and outside the skull through very small incisions in the scalp. The surgeon opens the suture to enable the baby's brain to grow normally.

The surgery itself takes approximately one hour and involves less blood loss compared to the calvarial vault remodeling; so there is little chance of requiring a blood transfusion. The babies usually stay in the hospital overnight and are then released to go home.

This type of surgery is followed by the use of a molding helmet. After the surgery is performed, the molding helmet is prescribed. The child is expected to follow up with surgeon every 3 months for the first year post-surgery to check progress of the helmet reshaping the skull. Additional appointments will be necessary with the helmet provider for fitting the helmet to child.

Post operative care: 

Following the operation, it is common for the child to have a turban-like dressing around his/her head. The face and eyelids may be swollen after this type of surgery. The child is typically transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) after the operation for close monitoring.

Problems after surgery may occur suddenly or over a period of time. The child may experience any or all of the following complications: fever (greater than 101F), vomiting, headache, irritability, redness and swelling along the incision areas, decreased alertness, fatigue. These complications require prompt evaluation by the surgeon. The health care team educates the family after surgery on how to best care for their child at home, and outlines specific problems that require immediate medical attention.


PATIENTS LOGIN

User Name:

Password: